Past Award Recipients

2016 WE Mentor Awardee— Sally Camper, Ph.D.

CAPMPER_Sally_125pxThis year Dr. Sally Camper, Ph.D. an internationally recognized leading researcher in the field of pituitary development is the recipient of the Women in Endocrinology Mentor Award. Dr. Camper has an outstanding record of achievement in the areas of research, teaching, mentorship and service. Dr. Camper was the only woman in her PhD graduating class, and when she joined the Department of Genetics, there was only one other woman on the faculty. Eleven years ago, Dr. Camper became the first woman to chair a basic science department in the University of Michigan Medical School, joining the first two pioneering women chairs in clinical departments in the history of the institution. During this time, she was continually funded by the NIH, was active in the Endocrine Society, mentored women scientists at all career stages, supervised an internationally recognized transgenic animal core and raised two children. Dr. Camper is devoted to equal pay for equal work and an environment of respect for all. In summary, Dr. Camper is a devoted scientist and mentor, and an outstanding role model for women in academic medicine.

2015 WE Mentor Awardee— Margaret Wierman, M.D.

This year, Margaret Wierman, M.D. Chief, Section of Endocrinology, Denver Veterans Affair Medical Center and Director of the University of Colorado Pituitary program at University of Colorado School of Medicine has been selected to receive the 2015 WE Mentor Award based on her accomplishments as an outstanding physician-scientist coupled with her long term commitment to mentoring and furthering the careers of her trainees. Dr. Wierman is one of the world’s leaders in reproductive neuroendocrinology. Much of her work has focused on the defining the mechanisms by which GnRH neuronal development is controlled in order to gain a deeper understanding of the pubertal process, infertility, and hypogonadism. She has also conducted seminal studies on the mechanisms of pituitary tumorigenesis. Her commitment to service has been recognized by the Ingbar Award from the Endocrine Society. In addition, she recently served as the Vice President for Clinical Sciences for the Endocrine Society. She was selected for the WE Mentor Award based on her exceptional support of the careers of research scientists and Endocrinology fellows many who have gone on to successful independent research careers- the success of which they credit in large part to Dr. Wierman. Quotes from her past and present mentees capture why Dr. Wierman was selected for this award:

“It is well recognized by junior faculty members, in the Endocrine division at UCD, that there is a short list of truly exceptional mentors; those rare and amazing academicians, who despite their myriad of other responsibilities, consistently go above-and-beyond to help junior facilty. Maggie Wierman is one of those esteemed few. She is the embodiment of a gifted mentor who assumes this role with complete heart and soul.”

“As I write this letter, I am reminded that one of the key attributes of an outstanding mentor is generosity. Maggie personifies this quality. She is extremely generous of her time in mentoring her own fellows and in the contributions she has made to WE and to the Endocrine Society. Maggie is generous in other ways as well, providing mechanisms for others to succeed and support for the promotion of others to leadership positions and for awards. I cannot think of any individual who is more deserving of the prestigious award from WE.”

2014 WE Mentor Awardee— Pamela Mellon, Ph.D.

Pamela Mellon, PhDThis year, Pamela Mellon, PhD, Vice-Chair for Research in the Department of Reproductive Medicine and Professor of Reproductive Medicine and Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine has been selected to receive the 2014 WE Mentor Award based on her accomplishments as an outstanding scientist coupled with her long term commitment to mentoring and furthering the careers of her trainees. Dr. Mellon is one of the world’s leaders in reproductive molecular endocrinology. Much of her work has focused on the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of pituitary and hypothalamic reproductive hormone secretion. She was selected for the WE Mentor Award based on her exceptional support of the careers of research scientists many who have gone on to successful independent research careers- the success of which they credit in large part to Dr. Mellon. Quotes from her past and present mentees capture why Dr. Mellon was selected for this award:

“Dr. Mellon has been an inspirational role model to women scientists at all levels. Her efforts on behalf of women trainees and faculty, locally and nationally, have had significant impact on fairness and gender neutrality in all aspects of promotion and success of women scientists.”

“Equally valuable is the knowledge that when seeking her opinions, her advice is balanced, thoughtful, and with a mind to what is in your best interest.”

2013 WE Mentor Awardee— Kelly Mayo, Ph.D.

Lisa and KellyDr.  Kelly Mayo, from the Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Cell Biology, and Center for Reproductive Science, Northwestern University has been named the recipient of the 2013 Women in Endocrinology Mentor Award. Dr. Kelly Mayo was chosen to receive the 2013 WE Mentor Award based on accomplishments as a “brilliant research scientist” coupled with his long term and dedicated commitment to mentoring and furthering the career of his trainees. He was noted to be very supportive of the careers of women scientists many who have gong on to successful research careers- the success of which they credit in large part to Kelly.

2012 WE Mentor Awardee— Elizabeth Barrett-Connor, M.D.

Barrett-Connor_ElizabethDr. Elizabeth Barrett-Connor, MD, FACP, FAHA, Chief of the Division of Epidemiology and Distinguished Professor in the Departments of Family and Preventive Medicine and Medicine at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, has been named the recipient of the 2012 Women in Endocrinology Mentor Award.  She is an internationally recognized clinical researcher investigating healthy aging, with a particular focus on gender differences and women’s health. Dr. Barrett-Connor has published over 850 research articles in peer reviewed journals. She is founder and director of the Rancho Bernardo Heart and Chronic Disease Study, begun in 1972, with continuous support from the NIH. She has served as principal investigator of several multicenter clinical trials, including the Postmenopausal Estrogen/Progestin Interventions trial, the Heart and Estrogen-Progestin Replacement Study, the Raloxifene Use in the Heart study, and the Diabetes Prevention Program. She is a Master of the American College of Physicians of Medicine and a member of the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Barrett-Connor has championed the training of women in science, formally mentoring over 50 women, with many more mentored informally. She spends countless hours coaching mentees on the strategy and technique of career building. Her mentees note that once someone is lucky enough to enter Elizabeth Barrett-Connor’s sphere, they can count on her guidance and support indefinitely.

2011 WE Mentor Awardee – Benita Katzenellenbogen, Ph.D.

Katzenellenbogen, Benita Dr. Benita Katzenellenbogen, Swanlund Professor of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been named the recipient of the 2011 Women in Endocrinology Mentor Award.  She is an internationally recognized scientist in the field of molecular endocrinology, with a focus on estrogen signaling and breast cancer. Dr. Katzenellenbogen has published over 300 research articles in peer reviewed journals and has won numerous research awards, including the Endocrine Society’s Roy O. Greep Lecture Award (2006) and the Susan G. Komen Foundation Brinker Award for Scientific Distinction (2009).  Her research accomplishments, as well as her loyalty and dedication to her trainees, have made her a highly sought after mentor by young scientists from all over the world. She leads by example and has created an environment in her laboratory and community of past trainees that fosters scientific exploration, career development, and a cooperative spirit. Dr. Katzenellenbogen’s dedication to the career advancement of her trainees—undergraduates, graduate students, and postdocs—continues well after they leave her laboratory. She has also participated in a wide variety of organized activities aimed at promoting the careers of junior investigators and eliminating discrimination against women scientists.  Through her efforts with the Endocrine Society, both as President (2000-2001) and a member of many society committees, she has worked to provide opportunities to young scientists and helped to create a level playing field for women in science.  Beyond this, through her own career success and outreach, she has served as a role model to women in and outside of her own laboratory and university.

2010 WE Mentor Awardee – Carole Mendelson, Ph.D.

 Dr. Carole Mendelson, Professor of Biochemistry and Obstetrics-Gynecology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School at Dallas, has been named the 2010 Women in Endocrinology Mentor Awardee.  She has an exceptional record of outstanding mentoring, scientific achievement, leadership, and an enduring impact on the advancement of women in academics.  Dr. Mendelson embodies all that the WE Award represents. Nationally, Dr. Mendelson has had leadership positions in Women in Endocrinology, for which she served as President, the Endocrine Society, and the Perinatal Research Society and has provided wise counsel as member of numerous grant review committees and editorial boards. Her internationally recognized, pioneering research contributions span the molecular biology and regulation of aromatase to fetal lung surfactant proteins and their roles in parturition.  This work along with a reputation as an exceptional mentor has drawn scores of trainees to her laboratory. Dr. Mendelson invests personally in each member of her team, fostering independence, professional development, and self-esteem.  And it is a long-term investment.  She is passionate about quality mentoring and considers it a continuum with a critical role for mentors throughout all stages of one’s career.  This passion extends beyond her laboratory.  For over a decade, Dr. Mendelson has been a leader in her institution’s initiatives related to women in science and medicine and “…has dedicated herself to taking down many of the normal roadblocks for young women in science, such as lack of child care on campus and the shortage of supportive female faculty role models.  In addition, she has dedicated herself to increasing career development opportunities for female faculty and ensuring equal pay and promotions for both men and women, as they rise through the ranks of academia.”  Dr. Mendelson is considered by her mentees as the ultimate role model and a respected colleague whose “fire and enthusiasm” inspires them all.

2009 WE Mentor Awardee – Dr. Bert O’Malley

 Dr. Bert O’Malley, Tom Thompson Professor and Chair, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology at Baylor College of Medicine has been named the 2009 Women in Endocrinology Mentor Awardee.  Dr. O’Malley is internationally recognized as a world leader in the field of molecular endocrinology particularly in the area of steroid hormone and nuclear receptor action.  ‘Pioneering’, ‘landmark discoveries’, ‘the first’, and ‘conceptual advances that changed the field’ are the descriptors uniformly used to characterize his contributions.  Dr. O’Malley has published over 700 papers and received numerous prestigious awards including membership in the National Academy of Sciences and National Institute of Medicine and service as President of the Endocrine Society.  It is clear that Dr. O’Malley’s research accomplishments are truly exceptional and alone have made him one of the most sought after mentors worldwide for trainees in molecular endocrinology.  However, it is the rare combination of impeccable personal character and integrity, unwavering loyalty to his trainees and colleagues and his extraordinary abilities that make him a born leader and exceptional mentor.  Dr. O’Malley mentors by providing an environment of academic excellence, infectious enthusiasm for research and learning, unwavering support for colleagues and an open generosity and thorough enjoyment of their achievements…an environment where any scientist can succeed, be they male or female. The sustained friendships among his former trainees and colleagues and their enormous respect and loyalty toward him are the strongest collective endorsement of his worthiness of the WE Mentor Award.  Also notable is that his dedication to career development of his graduate students, postdocs and faculty continues after they leave the department.  Dr. O’Malley has many strengths as a mentor, but it is his support of women transitioning to academic positions and women in academic positions that sets him apart.  He discriminates only on the basis of academic achievement and has always been proactive in promoting the same principles of equal opportunity and academic excellence throughout his institution. Although his leadership and mentorship are global, women in endocrinology most certainly have been the beneficiaries of Dr. O’Malley’s leadership, collegiality, and selfless contributions to the field.

2008 WE Mentor Awardee – Dr. Mary Dallman

“WE has been such an important organization for me over time. I could not be more pleased with how it’s grown, and how it keeps taking on new roles that are important not only for women but for scientists generally.  I’m terrifically grateful to WE for the 2008 Mentor Award – it means a great deal to have come from WE, and, of course, it’s all about the students we train.  William James was so completely right when he said that Science is a social process. ” Dr. Mary F. Dallman, Professor of Physiology at the University of California, San Francisco, has been named the 2008 Women in Endocrinology Mentor Awardee.  Dr. Dallman is acknowledged as the preeminent expert on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and its interaction with a wide variety of other physiological systems.  Her contributions are breathtaking in their breadth and depth.  Mary received her BA from Smith College Magna Cum Laude and her PhD from Stanford University.  It was there, working with Gene Yates, that Mary first described fast-glucocorticoid feedback – the notion that increasing corticosteroid levels can inhibit ACTH responses to stimuli within seconds.  This seminal discovery, made while Mary was a graduate student, helped to usher in the era of non-genomic steroid effects.  Mary then moved to UCSF to do a post-doctoral fellowship with Fran Ganong.  Mary became an Assistant Professor of Physiology at UCSF and rapidly rose to the position of Professor.  In addition to “fast-feedback”, Mary’s contributions are truly amazing: she studied compensatory adrenal growth, the adrenal sensitivity to ACTH, the loop-gain of the HPA axis, the receptor types through which the brain senses changes in corticosteroid levels, and the effects of repeated stress on the HPA axis.  Mary’s most recent work has truly been paradigm shifting – she has discovered a myriad of interactions among stress, feeding, and HPA function, and has examined the putative role of “comfort food” in altering the response to stress.  Mary has received many awards including the MT Jones Prize from the British Neuroendocrine Society and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Society of Psychoneuroendocrinology.  She has served as editor of Endocrinology and AJP, and has served as President of Women in Endocrinology, on the Endocrine Society Council, and for many years, as a member of the NIH Endocrinology Study Section. Mary truly shines as a mentor.  Her style is eclectic and innovative and, her personality, magnetic.  She uses the Socratic method better than anyone – always probing and asking more questions until one realizes there is a lot left to do. Her trainees (children and grandchildren) populate institutions all over the world.  Her trainees continue to depend on Mary for sound advice many years after their glorious San Francisco experience.

 2007 WE Mentor Awardee – Dr. JoAnne Richards

 Dr. JoAnne Richards, Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston has been named the 2007 Women in Endocrinology Mentor Awardee. Dr. Richards is recognized world–wide for her seminal contributions to our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling follicular development, ovulation, and luteinization. For over 25 years Dr. Richards has integrated in vivo hormonal regulation of ovarian physiology with the characterization of the cellular and molecular events in the ovary. Her contributions to the field of ovarian physiology have shaped the field. Dr Richards has been recognized for these contributions and has been the recipient of numerous academic awards, including the Gerald Aurbach Award from the Endocrine Society in 1998 and the Pioneer Lecturer Award from Frontiers in Reproduction in 2003. Dr. Richards has also served on NIH review panels in reproductive biology and biochemical endocrinology, and has been heavily involved in scientific societies, serving on the Endocrine Society Council, and as an Associate Editor of Molecular Endocrinology, as the Director of the Society for the Study of Reproduction and as Associate Editor for the journal Biology of Reproduction. Dr. Richards´ scientific accomplishments are matched by her enthusiastic support of training women and men in science, both in and out of the Endocrine field. She has been the Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology at Baylor College of Medicine (previously the Department of Cell Biology) for almost 20 years, mentoring and advising scores of students throughout their graduate studies at Baylor College of Medicine. She has personally served as major advisor for over 20 students, 80% of whom are women, and mentored another 23 post–doctoral fellows. Dr. Richards´ rich training environment in ovarian physiology has also been host to 9 visiting international scientists. JoAnne mentors by example. Her dedication to personal, scientific, and professional excellence and to academic rigor prepares her trainees to flourish in whatever aspect of science and/or medicine they choose to become engaged. Dr. Richards continues to mentor her trainees throughout their varied careers. Her academic progeny have assumed broad roles including academic faculty,clinical scientists, or moved to industry to work in research and discovery, development, regulatory or clinical trial arenas. In any and all of these paths, Dr. Richards is always there to mentor her trainees as scientists, colleagues, and friends.

2006 WE Mentor Awardee – Dr. Anna Steinberger

Dr. Anna Steinberger is Professor Emerita in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at the University of Texas Medical School in Houston. She pioneered in vitro approaches for the study of the progression of spermatogenesis in organ culture and developed methods for the isolation and culture of specific testicular and pituitary cells. She and her colleagues defined hormone targets and signaling pathways in these cells. She authored over 250 scientific publications and received a number of prestigious awards, including the Distinguished Andrologist Award of the American Society of Andrology, the first honorary member of the Polish Andrology Society, the Medal from the Jagellonian University, and the Outstanding Women in Science – Women of Excellence Award by the Federation of Houston Professional Women. She served as President of the American Society of Andrology. She trained and influenced a number of scientists who have gone on to important careers in many parts of the world. After retirement, Dr. Steinberger accepted the position of Assistant Dean for Faculty Affairs at UT Houston. In that capacity, she promoted career development opportunities for faculty women, including a number of highly successful career development programs, and was awarded the Women in Science Silver Professional Achievement Award for contributing substantially to the development of women in academic medicine. She continues to mentor women at various stages of their career. She is now working at her third career–as docent and on the Board of Directors for the Holocaust Museum in Houston. Dr. Steinberger is recognized for her contributions as pioneering scientist, role model and advocate for women scientists and young scientists in general.

2005 WE Mentor Awardee – Dr. E. Chester Ridgway

Dr. E. Chester Ridgway has been Head of the Division of Endocrinology at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center for nearly 20 years, following 5 years as Chief of the Thyroid Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital. He is a recognized leader in the field of clinical thyroidology and has made very significant contributions to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the cell–specific expression and regulation of the TSH alpha– and beta–subunit genes. He is also a devoted teacher, who has trained and mentored a large number of fellows both in Boston and in Colorado. Over 70% of the 40 fellows whom he trained in Colorado are women, three quarters of whom have chosen an academic career, inspired by his enthusiasm and encouragement.

2005 WE Mentor Awardee 2004 – Dr. Jo Anne Brasel

Dr. Jo Anne Brasel (Chief, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, Harbor–UCLA Medical Center) was honored for her ongoing support and mentorship of trainees. Dr. Brasel is an outstanding academic pediatric endocrinologist and teacher who has made major contributions to the mentorship and career advancement of women and men in the field of endocrinology. She has also had a major influence on the development of university policies to promote the professional development of women in academic medicine.

2003 WE Mentor Awardees – Phyllis Wise & William Chin

Drs. Phyllis Wise (Professor of Neurology, Physiology and Behavior, Division of Biological Science, University of California at Davis) and William Chin (Professor of Medicine and Chief, Lily Corporate Center, Lilly Research Laboratories) shared in this honor for their ongoing support and mentorship of trainees.

 

2002 WE Mentor Awardee – Anne Klibanski

Dr. Anne Klibanski, Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School has been named the 2002 Women in Endocrinology Mentor Awardee. Dr. Klibanski is well known for her research contributions in the field of premenopausal osteoporosis and pituitary tumor pathogenesis. In fact she just received the 2002 Clinical Investigator Award from the Endocrine Society in recognition of her many contributions to these fields. In addition, Dr. Klibanski has served on NIH Study Sections, on the Editorial Board of The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism and as an active participant in the governance of The Endocrine Society and WE. With her appointment as the first female Professor of Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital in 1997, Dr. Klibanski became a pioneer for women in academic medicine. To promote the success of junior women faculty, Dr. Klibanski has worked to alter structural impediments to the advancement of women in academics at MGH and Harvard Medical School. Dr. Klibanski was a founding member of the MGH Committee of Women in Science. Through her leadership on this committee, the Office of Women´s Careers at MGH was established. This committee supports the professional development of women faculty through educational activities designed to enhance leadership skills and provide career counseling. Also, in her role as a founding member of this committee, Dr. Klibanski was instrumental in establishing the Claflin Distinguished Scholar Awards, which provide funding for junior women faculty with primary child rearing responsibilities to hire research assistants during a period of reduction in working hours. This award has had a tremendous impact in allowing junior women faculty to overcome obstacles in their academic advancement. For her significant work in advancement of careers of women faculty, Dr. Klibanski was awarded the Harvard Medical School Dean´s Award for Advancement of Women Faculty in 1998.

2001 WE Mentor Awardee – Jack Gorski

Dr. Jack Gorski, Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin and former President of the Endocrine Society, was the 2001 Women in Endocrinology Mentor Awardee. Dr. Gorski is best known for his discovery and characterization of estrogen receptors, a discovery that opened a new field of nuclear receptors and their intracellular signaling pathways. The importance of his work has been recognized by numerous awards, including election to the National Academy of Sciences, the Endocrine Society Ernst Oppenheimer Memorial Award, and the Gregory Pinkus Medal and Award. Based on his distinguished leadership and research, teaching, and training of scientists, the Endocrine Society also honored Dr. Gorski with the Robert H. Williams Distinguished Lectureship Award and the Fred Conrad Koch Award, the highest award given to a scientist by the Society. Dr. Gorski served as President of the Endocrine Society in 1990. Dr. Gorski´s scientific accomplishments are matched by his dedicated and enthusiastic support of training women in science. He has trained nearly 100 graduate students and postdoctoral scientists, a third of whom have been women. He has provided a training environment in which women have been encouraged for independence and success in science and has provided them the tools to allow them to flourish in research, academics, biotechnology, the pharmaceutical industry and in government agencies. In addition, teaching fundamental concepts and analytical and presentation skills, he has taught his trainees about the importance of the freedom of thinking in scientific pursuit and of networking with colleagues in research.

2000 WE Mentor Awardee – Dr. William F. Crowley

Dr. William F. Crowley, Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Chief of the Reproductive Endocrine Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital, was the 2000 Women in Endocrinology Mentor Awardee. Dr. Crowley,is a leader in the field of neuroendocrinology of the reproductive system and has made seminal contributions to our understanding of puberty and the use of pulsatile GnRH for the treatment of hypogonadism. The importance of his work has been recognized by numerous awards, including the Endocrine Society´s Clinical Investigator Award. He has been deeply involved in several scientific societies, currently serving on the Endocrine Society Council. He is currently President–elect of the Endocrine Society. Dr. Crowley´s scientific accomplishments are matched by his dedicated and enthusiastic support of training women in science. Dr. Crowley has trained almost 50 fellows, 60% of whom are women and many are leaders in reproductive medicine. The vast majority of his postdoctoral trainees remain in academic medicine, a remarkable achievement in itself. He has provided a training environment in which women have been encouraged to succeed in science and has provided the tools to allow them to flourish in the research and academic worlds. In addition, to teaching state–of–the–art methods, fundamental concepts and analytical and presentation skills, he has taught his trainees about the culture of medicine and the importance of networking with colleagues in research and clinical investigation.

1999 WE Mentor Awardee – Dr. Anita H. Payne

Dr. Anita H. Payne, Professor Emerita, at the University of Michigan and Senior Research Scientist, at Stanford University School of Medicine has been named the 1999 Women in Endocrinology Mentor Awardee. Dr. Payne is a leader in the field of steroid hormone biosynthesis and reproductive endocrinology. Her contributions in the area of genetic determinants of steroid hormone biosynthesis have led to numerous awards. In 1994, the Anita H. Payne Annual Lectureship in Reproductive Endocrinology was established by the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Michigan. Dr. Payne has served as President of the Society for the study of reproduction and has served on many NIH study sections. In addition to her impressive scientific accomplishments, Dr. Payne is a nationally recognized leader in promoting the careers of women in academic medicine. She has given generously of her time and effort and worked tirelessly toward mentoring women graduate students and junior faculty in their research careers. She has been an early advocate for women in academic medicine, serving as chairperson of Michigan Women in Science, on the University of Michigan Women in Science Faculty Advisory Committee and on the Executive Committee of the Center for Continuing Education for Women. Dr. Payne´s contributions at the University of Michigan were recognized when she was awarded the Academic Women´s Caucus Award for leadership, scholarship and impact on the betterment of women.

Obituary

1998 WE Mentor Awardee – Dr. Y. Peng Loh

Dr. Y. Peng Loh, Chief, Section on Cellular Neurobiology at the National Institute of Child Health and Development has been named the 1998 Women in Endocrinology Mentor Awardee. Dr. Loh is a leader in the field of protein processing and trafficking. Her studies have provided seminal information on the mechanisms underlying the intracellular sorting of peptide hormones and neurotransmitters to the regulated secretorypathway. She has identified the key proteolytic events and enzymes involved in the processing of prohormones to biologically active peptides in the endocrine and nervous systems and her studies have provided insights into the molecular basis for diseases, such as Familial Hyperinsulinemic Diabetes and ACTH deficiency due to intracellular accumulation of prohormones. For these scientific achievements, Dr. Loh has received the Pfizer Lectureship, the Proctor and Gamble Lectureship, and the Public Health Superior Service Award as well as numerous invitations to present her work at international and national meetings. Dr. Loh has also demonstrated a deep commitment to the advancement of women in science. In addition to advising many students and fellows in her own laboratory and in other laboratories at the NIH, Dr. Loh was a prime mover in the creation of the NIH Women Scientist Advisory Committee. She served as the Women Scientist Advisor (WSA) to the Scientific Director of NICHD, and is currently the Chairperson of the NIH Women Scientist Advisory Committee. AS WSA, Dr. Loh initiated new guidelines at the NIH for recognition of the professional accomplishments of women scientists. She negotiated gender–based pay inequity adjustments, successfully negotiated a flextime work schedule to facilitate child care without loss of productivity, and organized career seminars for postdoctoral fellows. Furthermore, Dr. Loh helped initiate the Margaret Pittman Lecture at the NIH to honor the achievements of a woman scientist. Dr. Loh´s efforts in advancing the careers of women scientists have had a broad impact on the community of women scientiss and her contributions were recognized in 1995 by the NICHD EEO Special Achievement Award. In Summary, Dr. Loh is an outstanding Scientist and Mentor and a courageous individual with a mission of furthering women´s causes and equal opportunity. Her efforts have brought major progress in women´s issues, and she continues to seek avenues for support of advances in different facets of women´s professional careers.

1997 WE Mentor Awardee – Dr. Neena B. Schwartz

Neena B. Schwartz, Ph.D., has been named the first Women in Endocrinology Mentor Awardee. Dr. Schwartz is Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, William Deering Professor of Biological Sciences, Professor of Neurobiology and Physiology and Director of the Center for Reproductive Science at Northwestern University, Evanston, IL. Her laboratory played a major role in elucidating factors which regulate the secretion of gonadotropins by the pituitary and, in particular, the differential control of FSH and LH secretion by steroid hormones and gonadal peptides. Throughout her long and distinguished career, Dr. Schwartz has been a role model and an advocate for women scientists and a tireless supporter of young scientists both on an individual basis and as a spokesperson. Dr. Schwartz has served as president of the Society for the Study of Reproduction and the Endocrine Society. She was one of the founders of the Association for Women in Science (AWIS) and Women in Endocrinology and has served as the president of both organizations. She has received numerous awards and honors, including the Williams Distinguished Service Award (1985) from the Endocrine Society, the Carl Hartman Award (1992) from the Society for the Study of Reproduction, and an honorary Doctor of Science degree from her alma mater, Goucher College (1982). Dr. Schwartz served on the National Research Council Committee on the Education and Employment of Women in Science and Engineering and the NRC Committee on Continuity in Academic Performance, both aimed at facilitating the scientific careers of women. During the last 20 years, she fought for increased representation of women scientists on NIH Study Sections and Review Groups and was instrumental in changing systematic inequities in the compensation of women faculty at her University. More recently, Dr. Schwartz served as a member of the Task Force Concerning Women in the Academic Workplace at Northwestern and as the chair of the Committee on Women in the Academic Workplace. The effectiveness of her individual mentoring is attested by the number of former undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral fellows and colleagues who have gone on to successful scientific and medical careers in academia and industry. In her current capacity as Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Northwestern University, she has helped ensure equal professional opportunities for women scientists. As one of her former students so eloquently described her pioneering efforts: “Dr. Schwartz has consistently been willing to put her reputation and energy to work to level the playing field in science for women who followed behind her. Once she had been down a road, the next traveler had an easier path.” Women in Endocrinology is proud to honor her with the 1997 WE Mentor Award.